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New Year’s Black-Eyed Peas

Posted by in Holidays, Step-by-Step Recipes

Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

 
For Southerners, black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day are as mandatory a tradition as turkey on Thanksgiving Day. We’ve had black-eyed peas, collard greens and cornbread on New Year’s Day for as long as I can remember. Even the year my family spent the week after Christmas in Hawaii. While most families would have traded the sweet tea and peas for an umbrella drink and a luau, my mom’s side of the family considered this the unforgivable sin. My Granny and her younger sister, Dot, conspiring like young girls, packed dried black-eyed peas in their luggage bound for Waikiki Beach. Without them a proper New Year’s was not possible. So on January 1st, 2004 eight of us squeezed into a beach-side condo to enjoy black-eyed peas and not much more.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

The specific recipe isn’t important. The fundamentals remain unchanged: black-eyed peas and a dime. The one who finds the dime will also find luck in the coming year. I think I was a better Southerner as a little girl, because back then I believed in the dime magic. Now it’s lovely to think it might be so.

This is a new version of the family classic my Mom and I came up with this year.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Begin by soaking the beans overnight. If you forget (as we did) you can quickly soak your beans by pouring boiling water over them. Then they’re ready in an hour or two.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Once soaked, drain the beans.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Start by dicing an onion. Everyone can do that with relative ease.

But chopping a bell pepper is a bit more difficult. My Mom says the secret to chopping round vegetables is getting them flat ASAP. I only learned this little trick a few months ago and it’s been a culinary game-changer.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

First, lop off the ends of the pepper.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Slice down the length of the pepper, lay the pepper on its side, and use the knife to remove the membranes inside. Once the pepper is flat, it’s easier to slice into strips.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

See? Easy peasy.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Next, cut up your salt pork.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Sauté the salt pork for a few minutes on each side until lightly crisped and brown. In my opinion, we could stop the recipe here and simply eat these! But we must show some restraint and carry on with the recipe.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Add your chopped onions and peppers to the pot.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Cook until peppers are tender and onions are translucent.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Add the soaked beans to the pot, followed by the chicken broth.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Then the most important part of the recipe: Add the dime! (When we photographed this dish we couldn’t find a dime, so we used a quarter. Call it inflation).

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

When the beans are cooked and soft and the broth becomes opaque, add the thyme.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

We garnished with minced red onion and vinegar.

We may live in the North, but Mom makes sure we respect our Southern roots. (You can take the girl out of the South, but you can’t take the South out of the girl.) Come Saturday afternoon, we’ll be eating these beans with collard greens and cornbread.

Happy New Year, one and all, from Three Many Cooks! Hope 2011 brings you, well—everything promised in that little dime.

 
 

Printable Recipe

New Year’s Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated

4.87 Mitt(s) 8 Rating(s)8 votes, average: 4.87 out of 58 votes, average: 4.87 out of 58 votes, average: 4.87 out of 58 votes, average: 4.87 out of 58 votes, average: 4.87 out of 5

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Difficulty: Easy

Servings: 12

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Description

Ring in the New Year with Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated.

Ingredients

  • ¾ pounds Slab Salt Pork, Sliced Thick And Then Into 2-inch Pieces
  • 1 whole Large Onion, Cut Into Medium Dice
  • 1 whole Large Bell Pepper, Cut Into Medium Dice
  • 2 pounds Black Eyed Beans, Soaked In 12 Cups Of Water Overnight And Drained (see Notes For Quicker Method)
  • 2 quarts Chicken Broth, Plus 1 To 2 Cups Water As Needed
  • 1 whole Coin (i.e. A Dime)
  • 1 pinch Salt And Ground Black Pepper To Taste
  • 2 Tablespoons Tablespoons Chopped Fresh Thyme Leaves
  • 1 whole Medium Red Onion, Minced
  • 1 dash Red Wine Vinegar (or Pepper Sauce) As Desired

Preparation Instructions

Heat a large soup kettle over medium-high heat. Add salt pork; fry until golden brown and fat has rendered, 4 to 5 minutes. Add onions and pepper; sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Add peas, chicken broth, and coin. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, partially covered and stirring occasionally, until peas are fully tender and cooking liquid turns from translucent to opaque, adding water as necessary to keep peas moist but not soupy, about 1 hour. When peas have fully softened, season generously with salt and pepper and stir in thyme. Continue to simmer to blend flavors, a couple of minutes longer. Serve with a dish of red onion and vinegar or pepper sauce alongside.

Note: You can quickly soak your beans by pouring boiling water over them. Then they’re ready in an hour or two.

 
 
_______________________________________

Three Many Cooks is the always-entertaining food blog of Pam Anderson and her two daughters, Maggy and Sharon. Pam is a well-known and much-respected food writer and author, Maggy is a “hippy adventurer meets 1950s housewife,” and Sharon refers to herself as a recovering food snob learning to survive on a graduate student’s budget. Theirs is a strong relationship both inside and outside the kitchen, and it shows in the food they create and the stories they tell.

 

64 Comments

Comments are closed for this recipe.

Terri on 1.11.2011

Finally made this recipe for the New Year! YUMMY!!!!!

Dana Prince on 1.9.2011

I made this for New Years Day and it was absolutely delicious!! I think we have started a new tradition too now. I could not however bring myself to place a dime into the pot. I am a serious germ-a-phobe and could not imagine the dreadful things I would be adding to that pot of soup if I had put the dime in there!!
Thank you for the wonderful meal :)

Charlene Lucas on 1.8.2011

We have B-E Peas every year for New Year’s. But, I love them any time of year and make them when I think about it. What I’m getting at is, that I have eaten a LOT of B-E Peas in my life! My mom made the best. But, these are, by far, the very best B-E Peas that I have ever had! I made them for New Years this year for a group of friends. Everyone loved them and couldn’t say enough good things about them. I loved the red onions on top! Anyway, I don’t normally post, but I just had to let you know just how good I think these peas are.
Happy New Year!

Susie L. on 1.7.2011

It’s just not right that it should be 38 degrees in California.

Susie Bee on Maui (Eat Little, Eat Big) on 1.7.2011

Good thing you brought your peas to HI! I had trouble finding any this year. Did finally find a bag and tried something new-hummus made with black eyed peas. Delicious!

http://eatlittleeatbig.blogspot.com/2011/01/recipe-for-black-eyed-pea-hummus.html

Don’t wait for NY’s to try it.