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Easter Eggs!

Posted by in Kitchen Talk

Tasty Kitchen Blog: Kitchen Talk (Easter Eggs!)

Easter week is in full swing, and if you haven’t already boiled and dyed eggs, it’s more than likely on your agenda in the next couple of days. Dyed eggs are the centerpiece of many families’ Easter celebrations, so we want to share knowledge today about all things Easter egg. Tell us:

Do you have tips for perfect Easter eggs?

Whether it’s cooking, dyeing or using the leftover eggs in a recipe, we want to hear your tricks.

First, the cooking. We all have our favorite method for achieving the perfect hard-boiled egg. Some of us add vinegar to the water before it boils. Others skip this step. Some boil rapidly for a set period and then remove and add cold water to cool. Another method is to bring water to a boil with the eggs in the pot and then remove from heat, cover and let sit for several minutes to complete the cooking. We know folks who swear by using an ice bath to stop the cooking. How about you? What are your best hard-boiled egg tricks? Since we’ll be boiling at least a dozen eggs, we want to make sure they come out right. We’ll eventually eat these babies, after all.

Now for the dyeing. Always a fun (though sometimes messy) undertaking, we’ve seen some really fun variations on the typical approach and some clever uses of natural ingredients to dye eggs. TK Member Patricia from ButterYum shares a neat method from Le Creuset for dyeing eggs purple using grape juice. We also adore these crackled eggs from Stephanie of Girl Versus Dough. Tell us your tips for the best dyed eggs. How do you get the most vivid colors, and/or what natural ingredients have you found success with for dyeing?

After the hunt, we’ll be ready to crack open our eggs and use them for deviled eggs, a great egg salad or maybe perfect potato salad for Easter dinner. I always love a good Cobb or Nicoise salad, and both call for a hard-boiled egg or two. Then at least one or two eggs will end up in school lunches around here. I’m thinking I need to have another dozen eggs on hand! Let us know your favorite uses for your leftover Easter eggs. We’re ready for some fresh ideas!

We wish you wonderful celebrations with family and friends and hope your eggs turn out lovely and tasty!

 

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Zucchini Blossom Fritters

Posted by in Step-by-Step Recipes

Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

These Zucchini Blossom Fritters are a family recipe shared by TK member Katie. They are wonderfully unique, and contain the delicious flowers that bloom from a zucchini plant before the fruit forms. We’re coming up to zucchini season, so if you can find the blooms in your market or your own garden, you should definitely try this using fresh zucchini blossoms! Since the blossoms can be difficult to find in some locales, we were inspired to use grated zucchini instead. With this slightly modified dish, you can now now enjoy a batch of fritters anywhere and any time of the year!

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

To make the fritters you will need: extra virgin olive oil, grated Parmesan cheese, flour, milk, a whole egg, sliced garlic, baking powder, fresh basil, Salt, ½ cup grated zucchini (or 7-8 squash blossoms if you can get them), and cooking oil for frying. Try your best to drain the zucchini of excess moisture.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Heat the olive oil in a pan and sauté the garlic over medium high heat until lightly browned.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Add the grated zucchini and continue to sauté until cooked through and most of the watery liquid has cooked off.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Next, in a large bowl add 1 tablespoon of freshly chopped basil and 3 tablespoons of grated parmesan cheese.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Whisk the egg, and then add it to the large bowl.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Pour ½ cup milk into the large bowl as well. Start whisking all of these ingredients together.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Add the zucchini mixture and give it a stir.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

In a separate bowl, combine 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, and ½ teaspoons salt.

Combine the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Mix everything together until it is a little thicker than pancake batter.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Pour about ¼ inch of oil into a skillet; heat over medium high heat. Scoop the batter (a full tablespoon) and drop it into the hot oil. Gently press down on the top of the fritter with a spoon to flatten.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

Once you have placed a few in the pan, fry the fritters until golden brown on one side, about 3–4 minutes. Flip them over and continue to fry for an additional 3-4 minutes.

Remove from the pan and place onto a plate covered with paper towels (the towels soak up the excess oil). Let cool.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Zucchini Blossom Fritters. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Katie of The Parsley Thief.

All golden brown and delicious, your fritters are now complete. Top with additional chopped basil or brush the tops with butter. Enjoy them while they are still warm, crispy, and full of goodness. They make the perfect appetizer, party food, or afternoon lunch and would work well with all kinds of condiments, from crème fraiche to diced ham.

Go check out more recipes from Katie in her TK recipe box or the recipe index of her blog, The Parsley Thief!

 
 

Printable Recipe

Zucchini Blossom Fritters

See post on theparsleythief’s site!
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Difficulty: Easy

Servings: 4

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Description

Zucchini blossoms are the edible flowers that grow from a zucchini plant. In this family recipe, the flowers are lightly sauteed in garlic, then chopped and used as the base for a fritter batter, along with fresh basil and Parmesan cheese. They’re delicious!

Ingredients

  • 8 whole Squash Blossoms
  • 1 clove Garlic, Sliced
  • 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 1 Tablespoon Chopped Fresh Basil Leaves, Plus More For Optional Garnish
  • 3 Tablespoons Freshly Grated Parmesan Cheese
  • 1 whole Egg
  • ½ cups Milk
  • 1 cup Flour
  • 1 teaspoon Baking Powder
  • ½ teaspoons Kosher Salt
  • Vegetable Oil, For Frying

Preparation Instructions

Prepare the squash blossoms by inspecting each flower for dirt, or bugs (little critters do like to hide inside them). Give them a gentle rinse with water and dry with paper towels. Remove the pistil from inside each flower. Note: For this application, it’s fine to cut a slit alongside the length of each flower, to make removal easier. You wouldn’t want to do this if you were stuffing the blossoms. I also like to remove the little green spikes from around the stem of the flowers.

Saute the blossoms with the garlic and olive oil, in a skillet over medium high heat until softened and lightly browned. Remove from the skillet and coarsely chop. Transfer to a bowl and add in the chopped basil leaves, Parmesan cheese, egg, and milk. Use a fork to gently beat the ingredients together. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl and stir to combine. The mixture should be slightly thicker than pancake batter. If needed, add in a bit more milk.

Pour enough vegetable oil into a skillet to coat the bottom by about a 1/4″; heat over medium high heat. Scoop the batter by the heaping tablespoonful and drop into the hot oil. Use the back of a spoon to flatten each fritter slightly. Cook until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Flip the fritter over and brown the other side. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Sprinkle lightly with some coarse salt and chopped fresh basil. Serve while hot.

 
 
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There’s so much to say about Georgia, we don’t know where to start. Leaving Wall Street for the French Culinary Institute, followed by a stint at the Gramercy Tavern and La Chassagnette in France, her passion for food and food traditions are evident and inspiring. Visit her site at Georgia Pellegrini, where you’ll find more recipes, photos, learn all about her wonderful books (including her latest one, Modern Pioneering, and enjoy her latest adventures.

 

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Spring Cleaning Giveaway! (Winners Announced)

Posted by in Miscellaneous

The winners of the $100 The Container Store gift card are:

#818 Mildred: “It would be my dining room. Whatever craft I am into at the time, ends up in the dining room!”

#139 Erin: “My kitchen. We spend most of our time in there and it’s a never ending mess.”

Congratulations, ladies! Contact [email protected] to claim your loot.

 
Tasty Kitchen Blog Giveaway: The Container Store gift card

Happy Friday, everyone! It’s spring! Which means spring cleaning. And it’s spring break season! Which means more mess to clean up. So because we love you and want your heart to be happy when you look around your space and see everything neat and organized, we’re giving away two (2) gift cards worth $100 each to The Container Store. We want you to be able to stock up on the things you need to keep your house in order, and they carry it all: plastic bins, freezer containers, racks, shelves—you name it, they have it.

 
TO ENTER

To enter this giveaway, just answer the following question in the Comments section of this post:

What’s the messiest spot in your house?

Is it the junk drawer in your kitchen? The top shelf of your pantry? The garage? Basement? Your teen’s closet? You can share; we’re all friends here. Whatever or wherever it is, let us know in the comments below and you’ll be automatically entered! (And if every corner of your house is neat, by all means, ‘fess up! Then come over to my house please. Thank you.)

 
 
THE RULES

One entry per person, please. No entries after noon tomorrow.

Winners will be selected at random and announced Sunday.

Have a great weekend, everyone!

 
_________________________________

Contest sponsored entirely by Tasty Kitchen.

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Growing Vegetables

Posted by in Kitchen Talk

Tasty Kitchen Blog: Kitchen Talk (Growing Vegetables)

The other day, my breakfast consisted of fried eggs with a dash of hot sauce, and freshly squeezed orange juice. The eggs were from a friend’s chicken, the oranges from her tree, and the hot sauce was homemade using Meyer lemons and hot peppers grown by my brother-in-law. Knowing that just about every item came from someone’s garden made it that much more special to me.

That’s one of the reasons I keep trying—despite repeated failure—to grow stuff to eat in my garden. Sure, it takes time and work and patience, but the payoff is worth it. Not only are you rewarded with produce that’s often superior in freshness and flavor but you also enjoy the sense of accomplishment that comes from pulling off a “garden to table” meal. If you share that sentiment, then this post is for you!

We’ve talked about growing herbs before, so now let’s talk about veggies. Tell us:

Do you have any tips for growing vegetables?

I’m not much of a gardener. Oh, I love plants—flowers, vegetables, herbs, fruit trees, shrubs, majestic oaks and diminutive crocuses, willowy bamboo, stubby succulents, ornamental grasses … I love them all. My father has the heart and the hands of a farmer, but with the way things have been going for me, I suspect it might skip a generation. I’m still trying though!

In an attempt to make me look good, my friend Lacey shared a few tips for me to pass on. She just planted 839 vegetable plants, so she knows her beez-neez. (And okay, I think it was more like 52, but in my book, that’s just like 839.) She’s been doing it for some years now, planting corn, peppers, snow peas, beans, cabbage, you name it. She starts all her vegetables from seed, and this is what she does:

1. Plant 2 to 3 seeds in a little peat pot. Water well and put in a sealable bag.
2. Seal bag and keep in a place where it won’t get too cold. Keep the bag sealed, almost like a mini greenhouse, and don’t open it or even water it until seeds begin to germinate.
3. When shoots are about 2 inches high, take the peat pot out of the bag and transfer to your vegetable garden or a larger container with soil.

It sounds easy enough that even I can’t mess it up. Seriously, how badly can I mess up instructions that mostly involve keeping a bag in one place and doing and touching nothing? I can’t wait to try her method out! Of course, it goes without saying that you should always check for any special instructions specific to the variety of vegetable you’re planting. The method above seems to work well for the Southern California climate; you may have to vary it depending on where you are.

How about you? Do you have any tips for growing vegetables? Favorite veggies you like to plant each year? Any particular challenges planting specific varieties? Any questions that other gardeners here may be able to answer? Come share below!

 

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Fudgy Black Bean Brownies

Posted by in Baking

Yes, we’re really making brownies with black beans. Embrace it. They’re good for you!

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Looks Delicious! Chicken Shawarma

Posted by in Looks Delicious!

Shawarma is very similar to a gyro or doner kebab, and I was fortunate enough to live in a place where I had easy access to it. It's one of my all-time favorite street foods, so imagine my excitement when I saw a home-kitchen-friendly version here on Tasty Kitchen!

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Corned Beef Ideas

Posted by in Holidays

Every time I prepare corned beef, I always end up with a lot left over. If you find yourself in that same predicament, we thought we'd help you out with a few ideas for those corned beef leftovers.

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Korean Shrimp and Rice Porridge (Saewoojuk)

Posted by in Step-by-Step Recipes

Juk is basically the Korean version of congee or rice porridge. Saewoo means shrimp. All of the flavors are simply delightful, and the possibilities for add-ons are endless.