The Pioneer Woman Tasty Kitchen
Avatar of ThreeManyCooks

New Year’s Black-Eyed Peas

Posted by in Holidays, Step-by-Step Recipes

Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

 
For Southerners, black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day are as mandatory a tradition as turkey on Thanksgiving Day. We’ve had black-eyed peas, collard greens and cornbread on New Year’s Day for as long as I can remember. Even the year my family spent the week after Christmas in Hawaii. While most families would have traded the sweet tea and peas for an umbrella drink and a luau, my mom’s side of the family considered this the unforgivable sin. My Granny and her younger sister, Dot, conspiring like young girls, packed dried black-eyed peas in their luggage bound for Waikiki Beach. Without them a proper New Year’s was not possible. So on January 1st, 2004 eight of us squeezed into a beach-side condo to enjoy black-eyed peas and not much more.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

The specific recipe isn’t important. The fundamentals remain unchanged: black-eyed peas and a dime. The one who finds the dime will also find luck in the coming year. I think I was a better Southerner as a little girl, because back then I believed in the dime magic. Now it’s lovely to think it might be so.

This is a new version of the family classic my Mom and I came up with this year.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Begin by soaking the beans overnight. If you forget (as we did) you can quickly soak your beans by pouring boiling water over them. Then they’re ready in an hour or two.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Once soaked, drain the beans.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Start by dicing an onion. Everyone can do that with relative ease.

But chopping a bell pepper is a bit more difficult. My Mom says the secret to chopping round vegetables is getting them flat ASAP. I only learned this little trick a few months ago and it’s been a culinary game-changer.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

First, lop off the ends of the pepper.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Slice down the length of the pepper, lay the pepper on its side, and use the knife to remove the membranes inside. Once the pepper is flat, it’s easier to slice into strips.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

See? Easy peasy.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Next, cut up your salt pork.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Sauté the salt pork for a few minutes on each side until lightly crisped and brown. In my opinion, we could stop the recipe here and simply eat these! But we must show some restraint and carry on with the recipe.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Add your chopped onions and peppers to the pot.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Cook until peppers are tender and onions are translucent.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Add the soaked beans to the pot, followed by the chicken broth.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

Then the most important part of the recipe: Add the dime! (When we photographed this dish we couldn’t find a dime, so we used a quarter. Call it inflation).

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

When the beans are cooked and soft and the broth becomes opaque, add the thyme.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: New Year's Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated. Guest post by Maggy Keet of Three Many Cooks, recipe from Three Many Cooks.

We garnished with minced red onion and vinegar.

We may live in the North, but Mom makes sure we respect our Southern roots. (You can take the girl out of the South, but you can’t take the South out of the girl.) Come Saturday afternoon, we’ll be eating these beans with collard greens and cornbread.

Happy New Year, one and all, from Three Many Cooks! Hope 2011 brings you, well—everything promised in that little dime.

 
 

Printable Recipe

New Year’s Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated

4.87 Mitt(s) 8 Rating(s)8 votes, average: 4.87 out of 58 votes, average: 4.87 out of 58 votes, average: 4.87 out of 58 votes, average: 4.87 out of 58 votes, average: 4.87 out of 5

Prep Time:

Cook Time:

Difficulty: Easy

Servings: 12

12
x

Print Options

Page size Letter 3x5 4x6
Text Size Small Medium Large
Content Include description
Include prep time, etc.
Show image

Description

Ring in the New Year with Black-Eyed Peas, Slightly Updated.

Ingredients

  • ¾ pounds Slab Salt Pork, Sliced Thick And Then Into 2-inch Pieces
  • 1 whole Large Onion, Cut Into Medium Dice
  • 1 whole Large Bell Pepper, Cut Into Medium Dice
  • 2 pounds Black Eyed Beans, Soaked In 12 Cups Of Water Overnight And Drained (see Notes For Quicker Method)
  • 2 quarts Chicken Broth, Plus 1 To 2 Cups Water As Needed
  • 1 whole Coin (i.e. A Dime)
  • 1 pinch Salt And Ground Black Pepper To Taste
  • 2 Tablespoons Tablespoons Chopped Fresh Thyme Leaves
  • 1 whole Medium Red Onion, Minced
  • 1 dash Red Wine Vinegar (or Pepper Sauce) As Desired

Preparation Instructions

Heat a large soup kettle over medium-high heat. Add salt pork; fry until golden brown and fat has rendered, 4 to 5 minutes. Add onions and pepper; sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Add peas, chicken broth, and coin. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, partially covered and stirring occasionally, until peas are fully tender and cooking liquid turns from translucent to opaque, adding water as necessary to keep peas moist but not soupy, about 1 hour. When peas have fully softened, season generously with salt and pepper and stir in thyme. Continue to simmer to blend flavors, a couple of minutes longer. Serve with a dish of red onion and vinegar or pepper sauce alongside.

Note: You can quickly soak your beans by pouring boiling water over them. Then they’re ready in an hour or two.

 
 
_______________________________________

Three Many Cooks is the always-entertaining food blog of Pam Anderson and her two daughters, Maggy and Sharon. Pam is a well-known and much-respected food writer and author, Maggy is a “hippy adventurer meets 1950s housewife,” and Sharon refers to herself as a recovering food snob learning to survive on a graduate student’s budget. Theirs is a strong relationship both inside and outside the kitchen, and it shows in the food they create and the stories they tell.

 

Avatar of Erica Lea

Favorite Cheese Ball

Posted by in Step-by-Step Recipes

Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

 
I have made this recipe so often that I could probably do it with my eyes shut and one hand held behind my back. My dad loves it and complains if we try to alter it in any way.

My sister and I developed this cheese ball because we couldn’t find a recipe to suit our fancy. We added a little of this, a handful of that, and, to our surprise, created something deliciously savory with a mere hint of sweetness.

It’s ridiculously easy to make. Care to learn how?

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Here’s what you’ll need: cream cheese, sour cream, cheddar cheese, parmesan cheese, garlic powder, cayenne pepper, lemon, onion, dried cranberries (optional), freshly ground black pepper, and pecans.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Begin by chopping the onion fine. You only need about 1/4 cup.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Roll the lemon and squeeze out the juice. You only need 1 teaspoon.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Place all of the ingredients except the pecans into the bowl of a stand mixer.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Beat until combined.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Scrape onto a piece of plastic wrap.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Form into a ball. Place in the refrigerator until it firms up a bit, about 30 minutes.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Toast the pecans and chop coarsely.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Just before serving, roll the cheese ball in the nuts to cover completely. You may need to press the nuts into the ball with your hands to make them stick.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Serve with your favorite crackers. I recommend something simple without intense flavors. You don’t want to overpower the cheese ball. These crispy wheats from Back to Nature are quite good.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Favorite Cheese Ball. Guest post and recipe from Erica Kastner of Cooking for Seven.

Notes: The cranberries are completely optional. If you dislike fruit in your cheese ball, simply omit them. You can also switch out the nuts for walnuts, almonds, etc. Pecans are our favorite.

For the best flavor, take the cheese ball out of the refrigerator about 20 minutes before serving.

 
 

Printable Recipe

Favorite Cheese Ball

See post on Erica Lea’s site!
5.00 Mitt(s) 7 Rating(s)7 votes, average: 5.00 out of 57 votes, average: 5.00 out of 57 votes, average: 5.00 out of 57 votes, average: 5.00 out of 57 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5

Prep Time:

Cook Time:

Difficulty: Easy

Servings: 12

12
x

Print Options

Page size Letter 3x5 4x6
Text Size Small Medium Large
Content Include description
Include prep time, etc.
Show image

Description

Our favorite cheese ball recipe. Dad complains if we make any other.

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces, weight Cream Cheese
  • ¼ cups Sour Cream
  • 1 cup Finely Shredded Cheddar Cheese
  • ¼ cups Shredded Parmesan Cheese
  • ¼ cups Finely Chopped Onion
  • ½ teaspoons Teaspoon Garlic Powder
  • 1 pinch Cayenne Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Lemon Juice
  • ¼ teaspoons Freshly Ground Black Pepper
  • ⅓ cups Dried Cranberries (optional)
  • ½ cups Toasted Pecans, Chopped Coarse (optional)

Preparation Instructions

1) Place all ingredients except pecans in a large bowl. Beat with a hand mixer on medium-low speed until well combined.

2) Scrape the mixture onto a piece of plastic wrap. Cover with the plastic wrap and shape into a ball or log. Put the cheese ball on a plate and place in the refrigerator to harden, about 30 minutes – 1 hour.

3) Roll the cheese ball in the chopped pecans and place on a serving plate. Serve with crackers.

Note: this cheese is best if allowed to sit for at least 1 hour in the refrigerator to allow the flavors to blend. The flavors are best if it is allowed to sit at room temperature for 15-20 minutes before serving.

 
 
_______________________________________

Erica Berge shares her wonderful recipes and amazing food photography on her blog, Cooking for Seven. She also writes about crafts and posts more of her beautiful photography in her personal blog, EricaLea.com. There really isn’t much that this amazing young lady can’t do, and we’re thrilled she does some of it here.

 

Avatar of missamy

How to Open a Pomegranate

Posted by in Kitchen Talk

Maybe you’ve passed by pomegranates in the grocery thinking they’re much too exotic and pricey for your tastes. A couple of years ago, I found my friend Sallie munching on the bright red arils, or seeds, from the pomegranate. Since I’d only used pomegranate juice in teas and recipes, I talked to her for a moment about the pomegranate. Sallie said she loved when pomegranate season rolled around, greatly reducing the price while increasing the availability. She told me how she’d take one to work for a snack.

I was like, wha?! A snack? I can hardly open the thing. I’d have red juice everywhere and would’ve grabbed a pack of Ho-Hos by the time I got the seeds out.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

Besides, it seemed so exotic. And sometimes Jalapéno Cheetos are as exotic as I can get. Yeah, I’m not typically a healthy snacker.

Just keepin’ it real, folks.

But seeing Sallie, the woman who can swim three laps to my one … Sallie who is ten years my senior but who could easily pass as my younger sister … Sallie who eats pomegranates for a snack … I’m thinking Sallie may be on to something.

So, on my next trip to the grocer I picked up a few to give it a go. When I got home I did a little checking, first on the pomegranate and second how to approach the strange-looking fruit. Sakes alive, have you ever read about the pomegranate? Truly an amazing fruit.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

And have you ever opened one? They really are unbelievable. Pictures don’t do it justice. The vibrant red, ruby looking seeds are a marvel. And pretty tasty too. Not to mention that pomegranate seeds and the juice are a great addition to many recipes. The arils burst with a sweet, tart flavor, ending with a crunch. They’re to be enjoyed whole, seed and all.

Plus, the possible health benefits alone make the price of this fruit seem not so expensive. These include the antioxidant benefits of helping keep bad cholesterol from developing further, preventing blood platelets from forming clots (similar to aspirin), and even helping reduce inflammation, which can aid in treating arthritis. At least, what’s what I read in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and the American Journal of the College of Cardiology.

These are just a few of the possible benefits from the pomegranate that I ran across. Do a thorough check yourself. You may be surprised at what you find.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

There seems to be a variety of recommended ways to open a pomegranate. I’ve tried a few, but have two that I prefer. Wanna see?

Before beginning, I’d recommend—unless you own a red cutting board—laying parchment paper or paper towels out on the surface where you’ll be cutting. I’ve found that no matter how careful you are, unless you’re a professional pomegranate opener-upper, it’s difficult to avoid the juice splattering. Also, have a medium-large bowl filled halfway with cold water ready.

On to the two ways I get to the goodness.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

The first way: halve the pomegranate, cutting it from top to bottom.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

Place both halves in the water. Working with one half face down, using your fingers, gently coax the seeds out.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

Eventually you’ll be able to turn the pomegranate peel inside out to extract those closest to the outer skin. The seeds will sink to the bottom, while the white pith floats. Skim off the white pith and strain the water out.

 
The second way to cut a pomegranate is my favorite. It requires more cutting but I think is less messy in the long run.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

Start by gently cutting a circle around the top of the pomegranate, just barely piercing the skin. (Of course you can use a much smaller knife than this one. A small paring knife should work well.)

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

The idea is to take the top off without popping any of the seeds, like this.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

As you can see, I cut a few seeds. I could use some more practice. But how pretty is that? It’s like a little bowl of jewels.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

Once the top is off, you can easily see the different sections of the pomegranate. There should be six different “chambers,” roughly the same size. See the white pithy areas separating each section?

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

Using those pithy dividers as a guide, and, again, gently piercing the skin of the fruit but not cutting all the way through, cut down the sides of the pomegranate following where the individual sections seem to be. You’ll make six different cuts working around the pomegranate.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

Next, gently pry open the pomegranate.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

It opens up like a beautiful gift revealing all the tasty jewels inside. Simply an amazing fruit, huh?

To remove the seeds, either gently pick them out or repeat the steps above with the bowl of water.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: How To Open a Pomegranate. Guest post by Amy Johnson of She Wears Many Hats.

All of these seeds are from a single pomegranate. One pomegranate holds hundreds of these little beauties. A handy tip to remember when purchasing pomegranates is the heavier the pomegranate, the more seeds it will have.

 
So there you go. Next time you’re in the grocery store, grab one of these babies and take it home for a snack, or as an addition to a recipe. Be sure to let me know how it goes. And a big thanks to my friend Sallie for turning me on to this super fruit!

 
 
_______________________________________

Amy Johnson is a blogger who writes about food, travel, the home (both inside and out), and various observations and random musings about anything and everything. Visit her blog She Wears Many Hats for a dose of deliciousness, practicality, hilarity, or just plain fun. She lives in South Carolina with her husband and two children.

 

Avatar of Natalie | Perry's Plate

Cranberry Butter

Posted by in Holidays, Step-by-Step Recipes

Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

 
Need a quick, edible, last-minute gift? Have a few extra cranberries lying around? You’ve got to try this Cranberry Butter, a recipe from MissyDew (the woman who also blessed us with That’s the Best Frosting I’ve Ever Had). I swear it’s magical. Even more magical than butter is on its own.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

You only need four things: fresh cranberries, honey, an orange, and a pound of softened butter. Because you probably haven’t used enough butter this month.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

First give the cranberries a chop.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

Stick them in a bowl with the butter.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

Add the honey.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

Get out your trusty zester and get all the zest you can off that orange. Don’t have a zester? It’s probably not too late to ask Santa for one. Although you might want to spell out “Microplane” for him, just so he can get it right. He’s getting old, you know.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

There. Everything’s in the bowl. That took, what, 5 minutes?

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

Give it a good stir.

(Or more realistically, stir until you realize your butter isn’t as soft as you thought. Dump it into a larger bowl, buzz it with an electric mixer, and return it to the smaller, prettier bowl like nothing happened.)

Now, please don’t make the mistake that I made. Once I made this, I was dying to schmear it on something, but I realized, with actual horror, that I didn’t have a single thing to spread it on in my house. We were even out of bread that day. I almost put it on a tortilla because I was desperate, but I did the same thing that any of you might have done—I put a big glob of it on my finger and popped it in my mouth. Talk about a burst of sweet, citrus-y, buttery goodness.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

When I came to my senses and actually bought some bread, I discovered this Cranberry Butter will turn even the humblest piece of toast into an $8 piece of room service toast at a four-star hotel. You could also put it on pancakes, waffles, muffins, scones, chubby baby cheeks, and even popcorn,.

C’mon, I know I’m not the only one who has cannablistic tendencies toward cute babies.

By the way, I’ve had it melted over popcorn. It’s divine.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member MissyDew.

 
 
 
This spread would be great on so many baked goods here at Tasty Kitchen, but here are a few that caught my eye. And may keep me from eating the whole bowl with my fingers.

Tasty Kitchen Blog: Cranberry Butter. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate.Clockwise from top left: Whole Wheat Sweet Potato Muffins from HowSweetEats, Gingerbread Waffles from emily {onelovelylife}, White Chocolate Cranberry Scones from crobbins (there is a slew of cranberry scone recipes on TK!), Carrot Cake Pancakes from multiplydelicious, and Double Ginger Scones from angpritch.

 
 
 
Thanks MissyDew for a fantastic recipe!

 
 

Printable Recipe

Cranberry Butter

5.00 Mitt(s) 12 Rating(s)12 votes, average: 5.00 out of 512 votes, average: 5.00 out of 512 votes, average: 5.00 out of 512 votes, average: 5.00 out of 512 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5

Prep Time:

Cook Time:

Difficulty: Easy

Servings: 20

20
x

Print Options

Page size Letter 3x5 4x6
Text Size Small Medium Large
Content Include description
Include prep time, etc.
Show image

Description

I love this during the holidays. I first received some as a gift in a jar and enjoyed every bit of it, especially on toast or on homemade rolls or lefse. Make some for yourself and some to share with others.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound Butter, Softened To Room Temperature
  • ½ cups Chopped Fresh Cranberries
  • ½ cups Honey
  • 1 whole Orange (just The Zest)

Preparation Instructions

Such an easy recipe, it’s easy to adjust the ingredients to your personal taste. Want more orange flavor? Zest another orange! Want it less sweet? Reduce the amount of honey. Make it your own!

Combine softened butter, chopped fresh cranberries, honey to taste (about 1/2 cup) and the ZEST ONLY of one orange. Mix until well blended.

You’ll need to store this in the refrigerator.

 
 
_______________________________________

Be sure to check out Natalie’s own beautiful food blog, Perrys’ Plate, where you can see her growing collection of lovely recipes. There’s always something new to see there. Go visit now!

 
 

Avatar of ThreeManyCooks

Light and Crisp Waffles

Posted by in Step-by-Step Recipes

  As a P.K. (preacher’s kid), Christmas morning has never been normal for our family. Growing up, Sharon and I would have to wait until Dad got back from Christmas services before opening our presents (torture), and breakfast was something like eggs and toast or muffins. Don’t feel sorry for us; we didn’t know any […]

Avatar of cookincanuck

Graham Cracker Cookie Bars

Posted by in Baking, Step-by-Step Recipes

  Every year at this time, I grapple with the decision of what holiday treat to give my neighbors. The first year we were married—you know, when I was young, ambitious, and naïve—I made a loaf of our favorite zucchini bread for every neighbor. About ten hours into the process and pounds of zucchini later, […]

Avatar of Erika (TK)

Looks Fabulous! Holiday Platter Ideas

Posted by in Holidays, Looks Delicious!

  Our Tasty Kitchen members continue to amaze me with their crazy creativity and talent. It’s so inspiring, and you all are just so lovely about sharing your talent. Today I want to show you just a few recipes that I thought would make lovely and impressive additions to any holiday platter. They’ll make everyone […]

Avatar of Erika (TK)

The Gift of Food

Posted by in Holidays, The Theme Is...

  ‘Tis the season for giving (not that there’s any wrong season for giving) and I don’t know about you, but I just love receiving thoughtful, special gifts made by hands that belong to those who are near and dear to me. I also love sharing goodies from my kitchen and I do feel there […]