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Burnt Sugar Almonds

Posted by in Holidays, Step-by-Step Recipes

Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

 
These Burnt Sugar Almonds (Gebrannte Mandeln), in my opinion, are the only redeeming quality of a crowded shopping mall during the holidays. Luckily, they’re a cinch to make at home and will put all of your scented candles to shame. This recipe was submitted by Tasty Kitchen member Birgit Kerr, who is originally from Germany. These almonds are found roasting at the Christmas markets in Germany as well as Austria, where I spent about 18 months (a long time ago). I about fell out of my chair when I saw this recipe.

There are other variations of these almonds which use beaten egg whites, but I really liked this non-fussy approach. Plus, I didn’t have to turn on my oven.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

Five ingredients is all you need: raw almonds, sugar, cinnamon, vanilla, and water. For real.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

To start, grab a medium-sized pot (not non-stick) and a big wooden spoon. Add the water, cinnamon, and 1 cup of sugar. Bring to a boil over medium heat.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

Add the almonds, crank up the heat, then stir. And stir. And stir. And . . . stir. Don’t stop stirring. Especially to take pictures.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

After about 5-7 minutes of constant stirring, the water will have begun to noticeably evaporate. It’ll start to look like the almonds are swimming in syrup, and when you drag your spoon across the bottom, you’ll be able to see the bottom of your pot. When it looks like this . . .

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

Lower the heat, then add the vanilla and the remaining sugar. Because, despite what you may think, there isn’t enough sugar.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

Stir it around to get it incorporated. Yep, keep stirring.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

After a minute or so, the almonds will be coated in a sandy-looking sugar mixture and the pot will appear very dry.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

After three batches of these nuts, I can testify to you that now is the time to remove them from the pot. If you stir any longer, the sugar clumps will fall off the almonds and there may be some tears involved. We need that sugar.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

Spread the almonds out on a cookie sheet and let them cool. Chances are they’ll cool just long enough for you to pop one in your mouth and only wince slightly.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

They taste even better than they smell (especially while they’re still warm!), and you’ll soon be surrounded by snitching fingers and whining children and/or husbands.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Burnt Sugar Almonds. Guest post by Natalie Perry of Perry's Plate, recipe submitted by TK member Birgit Kerr of Scrapalicious Bytes.

If you happen to have a few leftover (or if you were smart and made a triple batch), wrap some up and give them away. You’ll make some new friends. Maybe even a few best friends. Perhaps a stalker or two, but they may be peeking in your windows just to get a better whiff.

Many thanks to Birgit Kerr (who blogs at Scrapalicious Bytes) for a wonderful recipe!

Recipe notes: I used this recipe as a starting point and reduced the amount of sugar to 1 1/3 cups. I also added the remaining sugar into the almonds when the mixture looked syrupy instead of dry, and I only cooked it for another minute or two before I spread them out to cool.

 
 

Printable Recipe

Burnt Sugar Almonds (Gebrannte Mandeln)

4.97 Mitt(s) 42 Rating(s)42 votes, average: 4.97 out of 542 votes, average: 4.97 out of 542 votes, average: 4.97 out of 542 votes, average: 4.97 out of 542 votes, average: 4.97 out of 5

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Difficulty: Intermediate

Servings: 4

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Description

There are many things I associated with Advent/Christmas time growing up in Germany. But none more than the deliciously enticing smell of fresh “burnt” almonds walking through a Christkindlmarkt (German Christmas markets). They are actually quite easy to make at home, and presented in cute little cellophane or paper cone bags, they make lovely favors or hostess gifts around this time of year, too!

Ingredients

  • ⅓ cups Water, Plus 2 Tablespoons
  • 1-⅓ cup Sugar, Divided
  • 1 teaspoon Cinnamon, Ground
  • 2 cups Raw Almonds
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Preparation Instructions

Use a heavy saucepan (NOT the nonstick kind) and a wooden spoon.

First add the water, 1 cup of sugar and the cinnamon and stir. Bring it to a boil over medium heat. Add the almonds to the mix, raise the temperature to high heat and stir CONSTANTLY until the water is boiled away.

The sugar will dry out a little but start to stick to the almonds. Keep stirring them around, so that the almonds don’t burn on the bottom of the pan.

Turn the heat under the pan to medium-low, to keep the sugar from browning too fast. Keep stirring until the almonds start having an even shiny coat.

Don’t be distracted by the heavenly aroma that is enveloping your kitchen—you need your full concentration on the task!

Now dump in the rest of your sugar. Keep stirring, and add your vanilla. At this point, I like to mention that if you have vanilla sugar or a powdered type of vanilla flavoring, do feel free to use that over the liquid kind. It tends to work better. If you do, mix it with the 1/3 of a cup of sugar you are using for the second lot of sugar.

At this point, there might be quite some noise ensuing from your pan. Some crackling and popping, but hopefully no snapping. It depends on how fresh your almonds were. Really fresh almonds will make a popping noise and the coat may start to crack. That’s the water in the almonds escaping. If the almonds are older, there won’t be as much of that!

Keep stirring until the almonds are fairly shiny, but still a bit lumpy. You don’t want them completely smooth. The best ones are the ones that are shiny in some areas with some delicious lumps of cinnamon sugar on other parts of the almond.

As soon as you see that happening, take them off the heat and transfer the almonds to a sheet of parchment paper. Spread them apart as much as you can, but don’t worry about some of them sticking together initially. BE CAREFUL, however. These are extremely hot, so only use a spoon. These babies can really burn you!

While they are cooling down, keep on breaking them apart with your spoon(s) until they are all separated. Fair warning: these are totally divine when they are still ever-so-slightly warm. There, you’ve been warned!

Once they are cooled, hide (ahem, I meant store) them in a dry, closed container. Theoretically, they keep for several weeks. I’ve never had an opportunity to test that theory.

 
 
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Be sure to check out Natalie’s own beautiful food blog, Perrys’ Plate, where you can see her growing collection of lovely recipes. There’s always something new to see there. Go visit now!

 
 

82 Comments

Comments are closed for this recipe.

Josef Touet on 1.23.2011

here is my coment:
this product i remember very well every day goin&coming from scholl i hat to go by the street where the candy man hat his stand
he hat a oil barrell filled wit charcool and a big copper bowl maby
25-30″ in diameter and about 12″deep.ther hi made the good gebrannte Mandeln in the fall and winter.the smell was all over the aerea.he was making i think the same as in this report.
i am from Aachen Germany and now here in the USA.
i never will forget them thanks to this recipe i can make my owne.
this city hat other good things Aachener Printen since the 17
century and still made today.it is type molasses Cokies with rock
candyaand other ingredient,wich is stil a secret.i Am here since 1958 as to install a chokolate plant from Aachen to necco in
Cambridge.MA.after finish i dit go not back toAachen.
this a little story of my life rgards Joe Touet

Meg3232 on 12.23.2010

don’t triple these unless you know what your doing I messed up and wasted 6 cups of almonds. I did salvage them but I was very frustrated that they didn’t come out like my first single batch and these were the ones I was going to give away for Christmas! :(

on 12.22.2010

These looked wonderful and we were excited to try them. After 4 batches, we’ve decided they are next to impossible to make and have them turn out.

Pamela on 12.16.2010

Just a note regarding raw almonds – I hail from Ripon CA – THE almond capitol of the world (takes a bow) but I actually bought my almonds this year at Costco – I know, the shame of it.

However, they were not raw – so in making this recipe, once I added the additional 1/3 C of sugar it was WAY too dry and I had to add a bit more water. So, IMHO if you are NOT using raw nuts, my OPINION is to stick with just 1 C of sugar.

In any case, these are AWESOME!! And so easy to make.

Meg32 on 12.16.2010

This recipe is great I just made them and they are wonderful!!! Ree I really don’t know how you had time to take pictures just the time I had to stop and get my vanilla and throw them in my sugar was getting hard you really need everything measured and ready to go!!! No time for stopping stirring to measure!
but they are great!