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Nonnie’s Persimmon Pudding

Posted by in Step-by-Step Recipes

Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

 
There is something so comforting about recipes made by grandmothers. Why do we like them so much? I think for me it is the nostalgia that comes with a recipe from her but also those good kitchen smells and the fact that no matter how hard I try, it never comes out quite like hers. I also love that grandmas rarely cook with recipes. They just seem to know what to do. They have an intuition in the kitchen that I strive for but seems to be part of that generation’s DNA. So of course this recipe called Nonnie’s Persimmon Pudding and submitted by MariahS was one I absolutely had to try.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

You’ll need: soft ripe persimmons, eggs, butter, buttermilk, baking powder, salt, sugar, cinnamon, flour, baking soda, heavy cream, and honey.

All of the good things life is made of.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

If your persimmons are really soft you can easily peel the skin off with a paring knife and mash them with a fork.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

But some varieties of persimmons are a bit harder so it would be worthwhile to puree them in a blender for a few seconds.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Next add your sugar.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Then your baking soda…

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

And your eggs. Now you could do it the “proper” way and beat the eggs first, but I was trying to channel my grandmother and defy the rules so I mixed mine once I added them to the puree.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

In a separate bowl combine the flour and cinnamon.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Then add the baking powder.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Give it a nice stir and gather your bowls side by side.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Incorporate part of the buttermilk and whisk as you go…

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

It will make a rather mesmerizing art piece as you swirl. At least it did for me but I’m easily entertained.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Next mix in part of the dry ingredients… and go back and forth between the dry and the buttermilk until it’s all incorporated.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Next whisk in the cream.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Then the honey. This was the last of a batch from my honeybees!

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Next you’ll pour in the melted butter.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Give it a good whisk until it’s well incorporated.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Pour the batter into a greased baking pan and pop it in the oven for 1 hour.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

While it cooks you’ll make the glaze for the pudding. Get some water simmering on the stovetop.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Then gather vanilla and a combination of sugar and flour.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Once the water is simmering add the sugar and flour mixer a little at a time, whisking while you do.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

The mixture will begin to bubble and thicken so that it becomes viscous. Once it does you can turn the heat off and let it sit.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

After it’s cooled for a few minutes you add the vanilla and whisk it in.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

After the batter has baked, open the oven just briefly. It will be golden brown and wonderfully moist.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

But you’re going to make it even more moist by pouring the syrup all over the top!

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

Look at that glossy goodness!

Close the oven door and let it all soak in while keeping it warm.

I was amazed at just how warm is stayed for hours just by leaving it in there.

 
 
 
Tasty Kitchen Blog: Nonnie's Persimmon Pudding. Guest post by Georgia Pellegrini, recipe submitted by TK member Maria (mariahs).

When you’re ready to eat it simply scoop it out and serve. It would be wonderful with a scoop of ice cream as well. I took this to a pumpkin carving party and it was a total hit. Everyone said it tasted like fall.

Thanks so much to Mariah for sharing this tasty recipe!

 
 

Printable Recipe

Nonnie’s Persimmon Pudding

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Difficulty: Intermediate

Servings: 12

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Description

My husband’s grandmother, Nonnie, used to make her really unique version of Persimmon Pudding every Thanksgiving. When she wasn’t able to make it anymore, I took over making it each fall. You can serve this warm or let it cool; my family loves it both ways. Nonnie passed away this year, but you can be sure that this will be on the Thanksgiving menu. Nonnie would have loved to have her recipe shared with others.

Ingredients

  • FOR THE PUDDING:
  • 2 cups Persimmon Pulp
  • 2 cups White Sugar
  • 2  Eggs, Beaten
  • 1 teaspoon Baking Soda
  • 1 cup All-purpose Flour
  • 1 pinch Salt
  • 1 teaspoon Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Ground Cinnamon
  • 1-½ cup Buttermilk
  • ¼ cups Heavy Cream
  • 1 Tablespoon Honey
  • 4 Tablespoons Butter, Melted
  • FOR THE SAUCE:
  • 1 cup Water
  • ½ cups White Sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon All-purpose Flour
  • 4 teaspoons Vanilla Extract

Preparation Instructions

Note: Prepare the sauce while the pudding is baking.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Spray a 9×13 inch baking pan lightly with nonstick spray; set aside.

For the pudding, mix the persimmon pulp with the sugar in a large bowl; set aside.

Whisk together the eggs and baking soda in a small bowl. Add the egg mixture to the persimmon mixture and beat well; set aside.

Whisk together the flour, salt, baking powder, and cinnamon in a bowl. Stir 1/4 of the flour mixture into the persimmon mixture. Add 1/4 of the buttermilk and mix well. Continue alternating flour and buttermilk, adding 1/4 each time, and mixing well after each addition, until all of the flour mixture and buttermilk are incorporated. Stir in cream, honey, and melted butter until well combined. Pour the pudding batter into the prepared pan.

Bake in the preheated oven until set, about 1 hour. While baking, do not stir; Turn off the oven at the end of the baking time, but do not remove the pudding from the oven.

Meanwhile, when the pudding has about 10 minutes of baking time left, make the sauce. Boil the water in a small saucepan. Whisk the sugar and flour together, and whisk the sugar mixture into the boiling water, whisking until smooth. Boil the sauce for 5 minutes and remove from heat. Stir in vanilla.

Pour the sauce mixture evenly over the pudding and leave the pudding to cool in the warm oven for 20 more minutes, being sure that the oven is off so that the pudding does not continue to cook.

 
 
_______________________________________

There’s so much to say about Georgia, we don’t know where to start. Leaving Wall Street for the French Culinary Institute, followed by a stint at the Gramercy Tavern and La Chassagnette in France, her passion for food and food traditions are evident and inspiring. Visit her site at Georgia Pellegrini, where you’ll find more recipes, photos, learn all about her wonderful book Food Heroes, and enjoy her latest adventures.

 
 

18 Comments

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Tonya Scarborough on 11.19.2011

I made this today and served with eggnog ice cream. It was so good. Thanks!

Angie on 11.14.2011

Being from Indiana, I’m able to buy frozen pulp. We have three little persimmon trees but they are years away from fruiting.

My grandfather made persimmon pudding every year at Thanksgiving. I wish I had his recipe although I’ve found one quite similar. Just thinking about the delicious smell makes my heart ache for him and my childhood.

Jonswoman97 on 11.13.2011

I live on the Idaho/Oregon/Nevda border, in the middle of the desert. I have never even heard of persimmon; however, I plan to purchase some and give this recipe a try. I am hosting a Christmas party at my house for coworkers, so I will try it out then. I sure sounds good. Always nice to try something new.

Diane on 11.13.2011

Is is possible to substitute coconut cream for whipping cream? There’s a dairy allergy issue in our house, most recipes have to be altered before I can make them. Thanks.

heather em on 11.12.2011

Hmm! This looks delicious. :) i used to work at a bakery, and every year persimmon pudding time would roll around. Only, ours was baked in a bundt pan and came out quite firm, and almost black! (which was bizarre because the batter was bright orange). i will have to try this recipe and compare (surely, they are both good in different ways)! Thanks for passing it along.

Asmita on 11.12.2011

That looks awesome!

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warmvanillasugar on 11.11.2011

I need this. Nooooow!

Yvonne on 11.11.2011

When you cook like a Grandma it’s because you’ve been cooking a LONG time. If you’re not you really haven’t been paying attention all those years. That’s what children are for also. If you didn’t have them you wouldn’t know how to love, really love! All of the attendant skills are learned at the hands of tiny, helpless, mewling and demanding human beings. And sometimes they really stink! But, despite helpful relatives and friends you learn by doing….otherwise it’s just information. Love isn’t informational is demonstrable. Love, joy, peace, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. That’s the Spirit! Happy Thanksgiving.

RondaT on 11.11.2011

OK, this is awesome! We have wild persimmons on our property and I had no idea what to do with them!
Thank you!!!

lauren in arkansas on 11.11.2011

We had a persimmon tree one time and I tried them when they were not ripe. Ooooooh, were they bitter. Kind of sucked in your whole mouth! Then a humongous tornado tore the tree out and sent it flying somewhere over the rainbow. I’ve never tasted a ripe persimmon.

Rachel on 11.11.2011

My husband’s absolute favourite :) Although we too use the native ones :)

Stacey on 11.11.2011

I’ve seen persimmons at the grocery store, but never knew what to do with them! I might get some just to try this delicious-looking recipe. Thanks!

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Clabbergirl on 11.11.2011

Fuyu persimmons (like the ones you’ve used here) are a non-astrigent type of persimmon. They are good for slicing and eating. Firm enough for salads or just eating out of hand like an apple. Hachiya persimmons are more similar to the American persimmon. When they are ripe and mushy, they’ll give you beautiful pulp for baked goods. Mmm. Persimmon cookies. If you are able to get yourself to a grove of Indiana persimmon trees, all you have to do is run them through a food mill after washing. Amber pulp on the bottom, seeds and skin on top! Also, my gramma would add a little whiskey to her hard sauce.

Allyn on 11.11.2011

I’ve never had a spersimmon, but this looks awesome!
I’ll try just about anything anyway.

liz on 11.11.2011

I’m with Kari in using the native persimmon. Of course around here in OK, its the very small wild persimmon and it takes a while to collect and get all the seeds out.

Warning to people who want to use wild persimmon – wait until after a freeze and the fruits are soft and dark gold. If you bite into a unripe one, it takes a long time to get the pucker out! I go to a local park to collect the persimmon.

All Good in Mommyhood on 11.11.2011

I have never had this – but it looks divine! Thanks for the recipe!

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Laurie {Simply Scratch} on 11.11.2011

Ooooh never had persimmon pudding… but now I need to! This sounds fantastic!

Kari S on 11.11.2011

I have never had persimmon pudding with Japanese persimmons. Living in Indiana we are lucky to have the native persimmon which makes persimmon pudding to die for! Lush rich chocolate brown color and taste :) We serve ours with a dollop of Cool Whip